Hayley's blog

Just another global2.vic.edu.au site

Current issues

October23

Some 21,000 children die every day around the world.

That is equivalent to:

1 child dying every 4 seconds
14 children dying every minute

Yet this story does not make it into headlines in new papers. These issues only surface when there are global meetings.

I think this is an issue because without the world knowing about this then we can’t do anything about it. It may be unfair to put the balm if poverty upon the media but it certainly has a big influence on what the world knows. The reasons kids are dying are mainly
poverty, hunger, easily preventable diseases and illnesses. Because the world doesn’t know they can not donate, help, or contribute in any way. I strongly believe people should know about this so please spread the word for the sake of all the children and their family’s.

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Mission Day

October16

So yesterday St Therese had their mission day. For any one who doesn’t know what that is it’s when the year 5/6s get into groups and create a stall. Then on the day the rest own the school had walk around looking and buying at the stalls. The stalls range from food to party games. Any way, the objective of the day is to raise the most money we can. The money we raise goes to children in Vietnam to provide them with clothes and education. My group (gen and I) ran I stall called H.G nails. We did people nails. I’d like to shout out to Riley Lewis and Sheldon Bourke, the only boys who’d got their nails done. My favorite part was knowing that the money we raise helps people and the looks on kids faces when the were having fun. The fact that we raised around four thousand dollars is awesome. Next time I think I would help out in the clean up more so I wasn’t leaving it to other people. Catholics help others because of a message sent by Jesus. Help others and others will help you. Also the message from St Theresa which says it’s the little things that matter.

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Australia and space

September9

How my big idea relates to R.E
My big idea doesn’t really relate but if it does it’s not in a good way. We are spending to much money on space research and trying to find a new planet to live on and not enough on world poverty. This reminded me of an article I read in am workshop with miss Todd about space research vs world poverty. I strongly recommend this to anyone further interested on the subject. Another way it it relates witch I first over looked is how this brought different country’s/continents together even if they we’re different. If Australia hadn’t had the satellite dish America wouldn’t have had the pictures.

In big idea I have been looking at how Australia contributed to the first landing on the moon. I found out that without Australia we wouldn’t have any of the photos or footage of nealarms stings 2 hour walk on the moon and would neve have witnessed his famous words, “that’s one small step for man, but one giant leap for mankind. It has been suggested that I watch The Dish and have not seen it yet. How ever I’ve found a review of it on the internet and it goes as follows.

Australia’s Role in the Moon Landing

As spectators looked on at one of the most highly-watched broadcasts of the 20th century, Australia rejoiced, and maybe even gloated a bit—but rightfully so. Without their help, the images of man’s first steps on the moon would have been missed altogether.

Released in Australia in 2000, the movie “The Dish” describes how the small town of Parkes, New South Wales played a major part in tracking, transmitting, and relaying pictures of the first moon walk from the Apollo 11 space mission. While America’s NASA primarily organized Apollo 11’s mission, it was discovered that a telecommunication station was needed from the Southern Hemisphere to transmit images as well. Tucked away on an farmer’s sheep paddock existed just what was needed—a 1,000 ton dish, the most powerful of its sort in the world and largest telecommunication device in the Southern Hemisphere

When President Kennedy made it a goal to walk on the moon before the decade was up, no one assumed that Australia would play any sort of role in the lunar race. However, as the movie describes, on July 19, 1969, the charming town of Parkes celebrated their accomplishment. Without them, the famous images that stir up national pride for Americans would not have existed.

In the movie, the descriptions of characters and attitudes at the time allow Australian pride to be expressed through reactions toward America as a whole. One of teenagers in the film lets her angst show as she describes America’s pursuit of the moon walk as very “typical of American imperialistic greed”. Other attitudes in the movie suggest international tension between the two countries, but a closer look at history will suggest otherwise.

“The Dish” highlights typical differences between the U.S. and Australia. The movie, which is of course only “based on a true story,” creates much of the tension and conflict described between the two countries. Many of the seemingly accurate details of political relations between the U.S. and Australia were actually added to the plot in order to “Hollywood-ise” the movie. While none of these creative licenses to the plot change the outcome, a good number of details are fictional, making it weak as far as historical accuracy goes.

For example, one of the major tensions in the plot, which is in fact fictionalized, describes how a simple oversight by a technician caused the Australian telecommunication center to temporarily lose power and thus the location of the Apollo 11 space craft as well. As a result, the men responsible cover up their mistake and lie to the U.S. for fear of disappointing NASA and misrepresenting their nation. Again, keep in mind that this twist is not true to life, but it does describe a type of fictional animosity that many might assume existed. At the same time, the writers did not go overboard in describing these sentiments. It did not seem the movie intended to be rigid in its portrayal of these historical events. Instead, it is a lighthearted look at Australia’s once again overlooked successes.

The movie has a charm about it that is carried throughout the film through small-town characters, typical Australian humor, and a love story, albeit an awkward one. Likely because it can appeal to the “Aussie Battler” mentality—describing the struggle of Australia to be appreciated and recognized globally— “The Dish” did well when released in Australia. The fact that it is also family-friendly and particularly clean for having been released in the past 10 years likely didn’t hurt its ratings either. The movie seems made for an Australian audience and demographic, with the “she’ll be right” and the “I reckon” lingo to support it.

What seems interesting after having seen the movie, is to reflect on the fact that though I have often seen the images of the moon walk and heard the story of America’s great accomplishments in the lunar race, I have never ever heard Australia given even an ounce’s worth of credit for playing their part; perhaps this again shows an under appreciation for Australia. Nonetheless, without these images, the U.S. would not have visual proof of their first place prize in the Space Race. Indeed, more credit should be given to Australia as a whole, because, just as the movie describes, Australia’s was “a vital cog in this grand endeavor” and has become what is said to be “…one of the proudest moments in Australian History.”

I will try and watch it in the next couple of days and will post my comments on the film.

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August14

Madeleine Bernadette nee Doyle Mitchell is currently 56 years old and living in Torquay with my grandpa Paul Mitchell. Her current occupation is a babysitter for a number of family’s.

Madeleine is the oldest of 10 siblings, 3 girls and 7 boys. Unfortunately one of them died in the first year of their life. Her parents are Mary Moran and James moran

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Text Analysis

August12

“Who Says”

I wouldn’t wanna be anybody else, hey

[Verse 1]
You made me insecure,
Told me I wasn’t good enough.
But who are you to judge
When you’re a diamond in the rough?
I’m sure you got some things
You’d like to change about yourself.
But when it comes to me
I wouldn’t want to be anybody else.

Na na na na na na na na na na na na na
Na na na na na na na na na na na na na

I’m no beauty queen
I’m just beautiful me

Na na na na na na na na na na na na na
Na na na na na na na na na na na na na

You’ve got every right
To a beautiful life
C’mon

[Chorus:]
Who says, who says you’re not perfect?
Who says you’re not worth it?
Who says you’re the only one that’s hurtin’?
Trust me, that’s the price of beauty
Who says you’re not pretty?
Who says you’re not beautiful?
Who says?

[Verse 2:]
It’s such a funny thing
How nothing’s funny when it’s you
You tell ‘em what you mean
But they keep whiting out the truth
It’s like a work of art
That never gets to see the light
Keep you beneath the stars
Won’t let you touch the sky

Na na na na na na na na na na na na na
Na na na na na na na na na na na na na

I’m no beauty queen
I’m just beautiful me

Na na na na na na na na na na na na na
Na na na na na na na na na na na na na

You’ve got every right
To a beautiful life
C’mon

[Chorus:]
Who says, who says you’re not perfect?
Who says you’re not worth it?
Who says you’re the only one that’s hurtin’?
Trust me, that’s the price of beauty
Who says you’re not pretty?
Who says you’re not beautiful?
Who says?

[Bridge:]
Who says you’re not star potential?
Who says you’re not presidential?
Who says you can’t be in movies?
Listen to me, listen to me
Who says you don’t pass the test?
Who says you can’t be the best?
Who said, who said?
Would you tell me who said that?
Yeah, who said?

[Chorus:]
Who says, who says you’re not perfect? (yeah)
Who says you’re not worth it? (yeah yeah)
Who says you’re the only one that’s hurtin’? (oh)
Trust me, that’s the price of beauty (hey yeah, beauty)
Who says you’re not pretty? (who said?)
Who says you’re not beautiful? (I’m just beautiful me)
Who says?

Who says you’re not perfect?
Who says you’re not worth it?
Who says you’re the only one that’s hurtin’?

Trust me (yeah), that’s the price of beauty
Who says you’re not pretty? (who says you’re not beautiful?)
Who says?

The peasant prince

‘This is your one chance. You have your secret dreams. Follow them! Make them come true . . . ‘
In a poor village in northern China, a small boy is about to be taken away from everything he’s ever known. He is so afraid, but his mother urges him to follow his dreams. For soon he will become a dancer, one of the finest dancers in the world . . .

So begins The Peasant Prince,, The true story of Li Cunxin’s extraordinary life. Based upon his internationally best-selling memoir, Mao’s Last Dancer, this remarkable picture book captures the essence of one of the most inspiring stories to come from China in many years.

With hauntingly beautiful illustrations by award-winning artist Anne Spudvilas, Li’s journey of courage and determination is simply told, and as powerful as any fairytale.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=EaVByQPMKi0″ title=”Angelina Jolie tears up speech marking world refugee day 2009″>

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THE VOLUNTEERS OF DON BOSCO

August12

THE VOLUNTEERS OF DON BOSCO

1.
The Volunteers of Don Bosco is a Institute for women only. It was founded in Turin, Italy in 1917 by the young women who attended the Salesian Sisters chapel. Today there are approximately 1,500 women who are Volunteers of Don Bosco. They live the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience, but, unlike members of a religious institute, do not live out their beliefs in the world. They do not live in community and do not wear any identifying clothing. They live out their Salesian commitment throughout daily life and undertake professional activities according to their interests, abilities and training. It is their goal and mission to bring the message of Jesus to whatever work or community they encounter. They work in offices, factories, schools, hospitals and many other workplaces.

2.
What’s is interesting about the founder is that they already went to church/chapel before they started this order.

3.
Teaching everyone and anyone the glories of god and his only son Jesus Christ.

4.
None that I can find

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Snapshot

July28

The rain pelted my head as I stood on the rubber platform, leaning out as car as my cable would let me. I gulped at the 25 meter drop and hastily retreated to the tree that was holding the platform up. I edged along pulling my metal cable along the wire. I watched people jump off the platform ether laughing or screaming. Suddenly I tasted blood and realized I had been biting my tounge. All to soon my turn came. I squared my shoulders and dangled my feet over the edge. When I got pushed of I screamed like there was no tomorrow.

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Reflection

March16

Today on my blog I completed and posted my 100 word challenge involving the words Melbourne, crash, formula one and racing. I also watched the btn video and posted a comment.

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100 word challenge

March16

Moonstone!, moonstone!, moonstone!, the crowd shouted my name over and over. I knew they all wanted me to win my 8th race in Melbourne. As I climbed into my car, the wolf on the side court my eye, courage surged through me and I sat a little straighter in my seat. Little did I know that this was the exact course that the big crash happened on exactly 100 years ago. As I lined up I checked out my competition, there was a formula one, I gulped but I wasn’t really nervous. Red Orange Green GO! I sped off, far in front.

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reflection

February24

Today i updated my profile picture, deleted some thing of my writing page, added phptos to my photo page and I added a page.

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